Does this software keep you in key?

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leighbeynon's picture
leighbeynon
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Does this software keep you in key?

sorry if im being ignorant as im new to the theory side, but does this software keep you in key no matter what chord you choose ?

i mean if my root is D does it just offer you the chords available in this particular scale, at the moment i dont want to change key, just create lush rhodes progressions over 8-16 bars

leigh

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

@Ben

on a major chord palette, you get (alomost) all chords in that key. You could even remove the other scales (except 'major') which will further narrow the chord selection down to pure major chords.

BTW: Staying in key doesn't mean playing always the same scale. The idea of of key is not bound to a particular scale alone.

tc

andre's picture
andre
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does this software keep you in key no matter what chord you choose ?

If you chose arbitrary chords that have nothing to do with the key, no. But as the previous poster already said, the Harmony Navigator palettes won't show you these "off" chords (except you specifically ask for them). As long as you pick your chords from the palette, they will fit in to the key.

Andre

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

oh great so you choose the chords that sound nice to you from the pallete and your set then,

i honestly thought staying in key ment playing only notes from the scale of the root key ? so this is not the hard and fast rule ?
i just thought there are notes that sound obviously off and they are not within the scale of the root ?

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supertonic
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[quote]oh great so you choose the chords that sound nice to you from the pallete and your set then

Exactly.

[quote]so this is not the hard and fast rule?

Well, it actually is, but it is too hard. Key is a notion of musical meaning and direction, not a set of pitches. Otherwise, there would be no accidentals (sharps and flats attached to individual notes).

If you're a newbie guitarist or keyboarder, you may want to "stay with the white keys" for comfort. You can do that. It's not wrong. Anway, there are many other chords that can be used in the context of a key, even if they are partially "outside" the basic major/minor scale.

I recommend you just play around with these chords and experience how they sound in the context of a key: Every standard major and minor palette includes some of these chords. They are usually located below the middle scale axis.

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